Restore pigmentation, reduce risks

ReNovaCell™ has been shown to restore pigmentation and improve the appearance of scars, sun-damaged skin, wrinkles and depigmented lesions associated with Vitiligo and piebaldism.2

ReNovaCell’s™ unique proprietary technology enables a clinician to rapidly create RES™ – Regenerative Epithelial Suspension™ – using just a small sample of the patient’s skin.

RES™ contains viable populations of all the skin cell phenotypes17 that have been shown to be essential for normal regeneration and pigmentation of the skin.2

Treatment using ReNovaCell™ can be performed in the clinic in as little as 30 minutes and offers many distinct advantages:

Advantages of ReNovaCell™

Restoration of Pigmentation

  • The multiple skin cell phenotypes present in RES™ allows for the appropriate interplay between the melanocytes and other cell types for normal pigmentation.1-9
  • Proven to provide over 70% re-pigmentation in 70% of patients.2
  • Viable melanocytes are successfully transplanted.1-9

Optimal Outcomes with Reduced Risks

  • Faster epithelialisation and the introduction of multiple skin cell phenotypes and skin regeneration factors mitigate against poor outcomes associated with delayed healing in older and health-compromised patients.4-9
  • Reduced ‘down time’, risk of scarring and infection in ablative procedures.

Commercial Benefits

  • Offers an exciting new revenue stream and the opportunity to expand clinic services to treat hypopigmentation, including Vitiligo and piebaldism.
  • Can be used in conjunction with other treatments including laser, dermabrasion and medical needling to produce superior outcomes using existing capital equipment.
  • A safe and rapid single-procedure treatment that does not require a costly laboratory.

ReNovaCell® Product Video

Regenerative Epithelial Suspension – RES

How RES™ works to restore pigmentation

Effective healing and the formation of good quality skin requires the presence and products of keratinocytes, fibroblasts and melanocytes.10-13 These cells are highly interactive and communicate with each other via secreted factors, their receptors and via cell/cell contacts to regulate the function and phenotype of the skin.13-16 RES™ contains viable populations of all the skin cell phenotypes1 that have been shown to be essential for normal regeneration and pigmentation of the skin.12,14,16

References
  1. Navarro FA, Stoner ML, Lee HB, Park CS, Wood FM, Orgill DP. Melanocyte repopulation in full-thickness wounds using a cell spray apparatus. Journal of Burn Care and Research 2000; 22(1):41-46.
  2. Komen L, Vrijman C, Tjin EPM, Krebbers G, de Rie MA, Luiten RM, van der Veen JPW, Wolkerstorfer A. Autologous cell suspension transplantation using a cell harvesting device in segmental vitiligo and piebaldism patients: a randomized controlled pilot study. J Am Acad Dermatol 2015; 73(1):170-172.
  3. Wood FM, Giles N, Stevenson A, Rea S, Fear M. Characterisation of the cell suspension harvested from the dermal epidermal junction using a ReCell® kit. Burns 2012; 38:44-51.
  4. Goodman, G.J. An automated autologous cell transplantation method for the treatment of hypopigmented scarring. Dermatologic Surgery. 2008; 34(4):578-581.
  5. Cervelli, V., DeAngelis, B., Balzani, A., Colicchia, G., Spallone, D., Grimaldi, M. Treatment of stable vitiligo by ReCell® system. Journal of Wound Technology 2009; 17(4), 273-278.
  6. Cervelli V, De Angelis B, Spallone D, Lucarini L, Arpino A, Balzani A. Use of a novel autologous cell-harvesting device to promote epithelialization and enhance appropriate pigmentation in scar reconstruction. Clinical and Experimental Dermatology 2009; 35(7): 776-780.
  7. Gramlich G.E.M. Laser Rejuvenation in combination with autologous cell suspension. Kosmetische Medizin 2010; 1(10), 25-29.
  8. Cervelli, V., Spallone, D., Lucarini, L., Palla, L., Brinci, L., DeAngelis, B. (2010). Treatment of stable vitiligo hands by ReCell® system: a preliminary report. European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences. 14, 691-694.
  9. Mulekar SV, Ghwish B, Al Issa A, Al Eisa A. Treatment of vitiligo lesions by ReCell® vs conventional melanocyte-keratinocyte transplantation: a pilot study. British Journal of Dermatology 2008; 158(1): 45-49.
  10. Rheinwald JG, Green H. Serial cultivation of strains of human epidermal keratinocytes: the formation of keratinizing colonies from single cells. Cell 1975; 6(3):331-343.
  11. Green H, Rheinwald JG, Sun T. Properties of an epithelial cell type in culture: the epidermal keratinocyte
    and its dependence on products of the fibroblast. Progress in Clinical and Biological research, 1977; 17:493-500.
  12. Singer AJ, Clark RAF. Cutaneous wound healing. New England Journal of Medicine 1999;341(10):738-746.
  13. Pastar I, Stojadinovic O, Yin NC, Ramirez H, Nusbaum AG, Sawaya A, Patel SB, Khalid L, Isseroff RR, Tomic-Canic M. Epithelialization in wound healing: A comprehensive review. Advances in Wound Care 2014;
    3(7):445-464.
  14. Sorrell JM, Caplan AI. Fibroblast heterogeneity: more than skin deep. J Cell Sci. 2004;117(Pt 5):667–675. wounds using a cell spray apparatus. Journal of Burn Care and Research 2000; 22(1): 41-46
  15. Hirobe T. Role of keratinocyte-derived factors involved in regulating the proliferation and differentiation of mammalian epidermal melanocytes. Pigment Cell Research 2004; 18:2-12.
  16. Yamaguchi Y, Brenner M, Hearing VJ. The regulation of skin pigmentation. Journal of Biological Chemistry 2007; 282(38): 27557-27561.
  17. Wood FM, Giles N, Stevenson A, Rea S, Fear M. Characterisation of the cell suspension harvested from the dermal epidermal junction using a ReCell® kit. Burns 2012; 38:44-51